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30 07
2021
Human-wildlife conflict under climate change
Human-wildlife conflict—defined here as direct interactions between humans and wildlife with adverse outcomes—costs the global economy billions of dollars annually, threatens human lives and livelihoods, and is a leading cause of biodiversity loss. These clashes largely stem from the co-occurrence of humans and wildlife seeking limited resources in shared landscapes and often has unforeseen consequences.
30 07
2021
Brazil - Frosts damage specialty crops
Another week, another round of frost for southern Brazil. This week, temperatures are lower than the previous two events. Temperatures as low as minus 5 degrees Celsius (23 degrees Fahrenheit) have and may occur in the stretch of mornings between July 28 and July 30.
30 07
2021
Canada - Drought prompts early start to Sask harvest
The latest crop report says hot dry weather has accelerated crop development and some farmers have started combining. Estimated yields for many crops across the province are expected to be well below average. Any rain now won’t improve yields but would have a positive effect next year.
30 07
2021
Brazil - Coffee, cane and orange crops at risk as temperatures plunge
Temperatures fell in swathes of Brazil on Thursday - with rare snowfall overnight in some places - as a polar air mass advanced toward the center-south of the global agricultural powerhouse, threatening coffee, sugarcane and orange crops with frosts.
30 07
2021
USA - 2020 Iowa drought & derecho destroyed $802 million worth of crops
A new report has shed some light on the financial impact last year’s drought and derecho in Iowa – two severe weather events that decimated millions of acres of corn, soybean and pasturelands. According to the American Farm Bureau, crop insurance covered almost $560 million in losses, while Iowa farmers were responsible for covering the remaining $243 million themselves.
30 07
2021
New Zealand - Mussel farmers millions of dollars out of pocket after storms
The storm which caused widespread flooding across the top of the South Island has also had a devastating impact on mussel farms in the region. The clean-up is estimated to take weeks and cost mussel farmers millions of dollars. When the wild weather subsided, it left behind a tangled mess of mussel lines on a number of farms in Tasman Bay.