03.12.2021

Italy - Bad weather strikes Sicily once again

A bad weather front has hit an area specialized in intensive cultivation in protected facilities between Gela (CL) and Ispica (RG), Sicily. The damage registered hasn't been huge, at least not everywhere, but some companies had to deal with the partial collapse of their greenhouses or polytunnels.

03.12.2021

United Kingdom - Success in chemical-free insect control trial

A unique field trial achieved a 91 per cent reduction in an invasive target pest first spotted in the UK in 2012. Agritech start-up BigSis conducted the trial in partnership with Berry Gardens, the UK’s largest supplier of berries and cherries, and the world-renowned research institute NIAB EMR.

03.12.2021

USA - New research takes aim at devastating citrus greening

Citrus greening, or Huanglongbing disease, HLB, is the most devastating disease for orange and grapefruit trees in the U.S. Prevention and treatment methods have proven elusive, and a definitive cure does not exist.

03.12.2021

France - Small harvest and difficult sales in 2021

According to the French agricultural statistics service Agreste, “On November 1st 2021, the estimated areas planted with melons in 2021 correspond to 12,100 ha, which is 1% more than last year and 6% less than the 2016-2020 average.

02.12.2021

Canada - British Columbia blueberry industry severely impacted by recent floods

From flooded fields and homes to supply chain issues, this is an especially challenging time for British Columbia. We stand with the those impacted by floods. Our hearts go out to the growers whose homes are flooded. Their loss is insurmountable.

02.12.2021

Spain - A storm hits the Asturian kiwi fields in full harvest

This weekend, the principality of Asturias was hit by bad weather. It snowed, the rivers grew, and there were floods. In Pravia, the heavy rains and the overflowing of the Nalon river have affected the KiwiNatur company's kiwi harvest, which is currently in the middle of the harvesting season.

02.12.2021

Italy - Perrina's varietal clementine innovation could be a solution in response to climate change

Perrina is a clementine variety whose breeder is the Calabrian agronomist Francesco Perri, citrus scientist specialist. The commercial diffusion of the variety, whose intellectual property remains of the breeder, will be managed exclusively by OP Armonia, while for the production of seedlings the only nursery authorized for the propagation of plant material is Vivai Milone of Lamezia Terme (province of Catanzaro, Calabria).

30.11.2021

Crop concerns in Southern Brazil and Argentina

Dry conditions across southern Brazil and Argentina will threaten early-planted crops with some yield loss concerns. Most of the soybeans are in the ground across Brazil and soil moisture will need to be replenished to aid in germination.

03.12.2021

India - Farmers In Bhadrak, Puri districts stare at huge crop loss prospects

Farmers are going to bear the brunt of approaching cyclone Jawad as they are yet to shift their harvested paddy to safety. Already affected by the pandemic, paddy farmers and vegetable growers hoped for a decent harvest this season. But, cyclone ‘Jawad’ is going to dash their hopes to the ground.

03.12.2021

India - Flood loss pegged at Rs 11k crore, crop on 10 lakh hectares damaged in Karnataka

Heavy rains in the last two months claimed 42 lives and left a trail of destruction in several districts. The state government has pegged the losses at Rs 11,916 crore. Agriculture crops in over 7.9 lakh hectares, 1.25 lakh hectares of horticulture crops, 74,530 hectares of plantation crops and 243 hectares of sericulture crops have been damaged due to heavy rains in October and November 2021.

03.12.2021

Israel - In MY 2020/21, citrus production dropped 4.3 percent below initial 2020 estimates

It is estimated that MY 2021/22 will be characterized by low production – falling considerably below the average total citrus production of 512 thousand metric tons (TMT) – due to extreme weather conditions during the growing season.

03.12.2021

USA - USDA improves, strengthens crop insurance for hemp producers

In response to feedback received from the producers, the U.S. Department of Agriculture is improving crop insurance for hemp. USDA’s Risk Management Agency is strengthening the hemp crop insurance policy by adding flexibilities around how producers work with processors as well as improving consistency with the most recent USDA hemp regulation.

02.12.2021

India - Unseasonal rain hits Belagavi grape growers, government to compensate farmers

Belagavi growers have started dumping their grape crops as unseasonal rains have caused heavy damage to the grapes. In Belagavi, over 4,500 hectares of grapes were cultivated in Athani, Kagawad, Gokak and other areas.

02.12.2021

Argentina - The weather changed the panorama for cherry

The cherry harvest began a couple of weeks ago, and now the Rural Development Institute (IDR) has published the cherry production estimate for this year. Cecilia Fernandez, IDR technician and part of the team that prepared the report, said they estimated a harvest of 4,100 tons of cherries, i.e. 14% lower than the 4,751 tons achieved last year.

30.11.2021

Italy - What's going on with clementines?

As is well known, the clementine harvest in Italy is down about 50% this year. Usually in seasons of high production, the citrus remains moderately small, but when the harvest is halved, as is the case now, the citrus has a larger caliber.

30.11.2021

Indonesia - With loss of forests, Bali villages find themselves vulnerable to disaster

Stretching across Bali’s southwest coast and up into the mountainous hinterland is Jembrana, one of the least populated of the Indonesian island’s nine administrative districts.

EVENTS

EVENT UPDATE: AgroInsurance Conference will be held on October 4-6, 2021

02.07.2021

As the global situation with the COVID-19 is being put under control with the massive vaccination being currently in progress, AgroInsurance team confirms that the International Conference “Agroinsurance, Reinsurance & Brokerage for CIS, Europe & Asia” is planned for October 4-6, 2021 in Biltmore Hotel Tbilisi. 

AIAG Online Loss Adjusters' Seminar on Hail and Frost Damage on Berries - 22nd June 2021

16.03.2021

Due to the uncertain situation relating to COVID-19, the seminar on «Hail and Frost Damage on Berries» will unfortunately not be able to take place in Switzerland this year as planned. However, the seminar will be held in Switzerland in spring 2022 within the usual setting. In preparation for this, we would like to invite you to participate in the following event: Online Loss Adjusters' Seminar on Hail and Frost Damage on Berries 22nd June 2021 | 1 to 4 pm (CEST)The program covers the following points: •Insurance situation and offer in Switzerland, portrait of Swiss Hail•Presentations from other countries on berry production, insurance coverage and claims settlement•Technical presentation on new developments in berry cultivation and production methodsPlease feel free to forward this invitation anyone interested at your company. Further information on the free online seminar and registration will be provided at a later date. We would be pleased to welcome as many of you as possible. Source - https://www.aiag-iahi.org

AgroInsurance hosted a webinar dedicated to Covid-19 Survey results

15.03.2021

On March 10, 2021, AgroInsurance International hosted a webinar “Covid-19 pandemic and agricultural insurance market. Report Summary”. The webinar discussed the impact caused by COVID-19 pandemics on agricultural insurance industry in 2020. Survey outputs were presented by Roman Shynkarenko, founder of Agroinsurance International. This survey was based on feedback received from 64 respondents from 29 countries. According to the survey results, COVID-19 did not have a significant effect on business operations of the agricultural insurance market overall. COVID-19 became an influencing factor in 2020, which encouraged insurance companies to focus on new technologies and solutions more seriously. Three companies sponsored this survey and during webinar they presented examples of technology solutions that helped agricultural underwriters and loss adjusters at time of 2020 lockdowns. Nick Ohrtman (Geosys) spoke about two examples of how Geosys analytics was integrated in their customers workflow in Brazil. Gregoire Tombez (GreenTriangle) presented cases of how agriculture insurance players digitized the loss adjustment process in several countries using solutions developed by Green Triangle company. Victor Yermak, CEO and founder of Skyglyph explained a cloud-based solution, developed by his company, that allowed insurers doing virtual inspections of clients’ fields and assets in 2020 by using their remote technology Virtual Crop Inspection. More than 80 online participants from 44 countries joined the webinar and contributed to the discussion adding more insights for better understanding of challenges faced by agricultural insurance industry worldwide. The webinar recording may be accessed through the link - Summary Webinar - Influence of COVID-19 on Global Agricultural Insurance Industry DOWNLOAD REPORT - Covid-19 pandemic and agricultural insurance market: Impact, changes and conclusions Source - https://agroinsurance.com

RISK EVENTS

Europe - Around 66,000 ha damaged - 23 million euros in damages

02.07.2021

While Vereinigte Hagelversicherung VVaG reported 30,000 hectares damaged just a few days ago, this figure has more than doubled within a few days. A good 66,000 hectares were registered for regulation from June 18 to 25. This is due to so-called supercells, which came from France through Baden-Württemberg and Bavaria to Austria and the Czech Republic, causing hailstorms over a length of several hundred kilometers. Local heavy rainfall with enormous amounts of rain from so-called "water bombs" and hailstones the size of tennis balls caused damage to almost all crops, often with total losses. On June 22 and again on June 24, the damage area stretched from Lake Starnberg via Munich to Passau. In Baden-Württemberg, the Neckar-Alb region was hardest hit on June 21 and, just two days later, the strip from Freiburg via Reutlingen to Esslingen. A locally intense area of damage extended along the North Sea coast in the Groningen-Norden-Aurich triangle on both the Dutch and German sides of the border. In addition, abroad, the polder areas on the IJsselmeer and the Baltic region were particularly affected. After the first surveys, Vereinigte Hagel now expects damage of about 20 to 23 million euros, a doubling compared to the beginning of last week. Supercells and what they are about - currently no end in sight The background to the now considerably higher damage figures are so-called supercells, which have a much higher damage potential than ordinary thunderstorms due to their rotation and longevity. "Their most important feature is the so-called "mesocyclone," a powerful rotating updraft. It creates a negative pressure on the ground so that, like a vacuum cleaner, warm and energetic air can be constantly sucked in at the ground and reach the upper edge of the troposphere (above 10 km altitude). There the warm air is sucked in and there is also the danger of possible tornadoes. Subsequently, in the area of the sinking cold air, it is not uncommon for extreme downbursts to reach the hurricane range. Over time, supercells develop a momentum of their own that prevents the sinking cold air (as compensation for the rising warm air) from entering the warm air area. Thus, the mesocyclone is fed with warm air for several hours. Due to the longevity and massive power of the rotating updraft, hailstones can be flung into the air several times, growing into large hailstones. From Monday through Thursday, conditions in southern Germany were ideal for these rotating monsters. A warm and humid air mass was stored in the lower atmosphere, so to speak the fuel for the engine of the rotating mesocyclones. In addition, the wind near the ground came from an easterly to northeasterly direction (which favored suction), veered nearly 180° to the southwest up to an altitude of about 5 kilometers, and increased significantly. In short, there was sufficient directional and velocity shear. This is a basic requirement for the formation of rotation in the updraft region and helps to prevent the sinking cold air from reaching the front of the thunderstorm cell." And it's set to continue. The DWD forecasts heavy thunderstorms in the south and southwest of Germany on Monday evening, as well as on Tuesday. Experts prepared for this, because in June or July such weather phenomena are not uncommon, as Vereinigte Hagel knows from almost 200 years of experience. Source - https://www.freshplaza.com

China - Farms suffered from hailstorms

17.04.2020

Hailstorms suddenly arrived in east China on 4 April to 5 April. Production areas in Pingdu, Laizhou, and Laiyang in Shandong suffered heavy damage. The hailstones damaged cherry trees, pear trees, peach trees, and apple trees. The cherry and peach trees in particular are in the middle of the flowering season, while apples are ripening on the trees. Some of the flowers have already begun to open in some of the warmer production areas. The impact of these hailstorms was disastrous for the upcoming production volume of cherries and peaches. The overall production volume will be greatly reduced and some farmers may have lost their entire harvest. Source - https://www.freshplaza.com

Ukraine - Losses in stone fruit and berry crops due to low temperatures

10.04.2020

The freezing temperatures recently recorded in Ukraine could lead to the loss of up to 80% of the stone fruit production and up to 50% of the berry crops, said Kateryna Zvereva, Director for Development of the Ukrainian Fruit and Vegetable Association (UPAA). “Apricot and other stone fruit crops (peaches, sweet cherries and even some plum varieties) bloomed earlier than usual due to the high temperatures in March. However, night frosts that were fatal to stone fruit crops were recorded in late March, and the vast majority of growers in Ukraine don't yet have modern frost protection systems. Moreover, the cold weather during the flowering prevented the bees from pollinating the gardens," she said in a statement to Interfax-Ukraine. As for berries, the UPOA this week received several messages from Ukrainian blueberry producers, concerned about the serious damage caused by the lower air temperatures at the end of last month. “Due to the abnormally warm winter and significantly high temperatures in March, blueberries in many regions of Ukraine had almost started to bloom; however, frosts struck earlier this week. The situation worsened because frosts returned again after a short warm period,” said Zvereva. According to UPAA research, Chandler blueberries were the most affected, with potential crop losses estimated at more than 50% in some regions. The Duke variety, which is one of the most popular among domestic growers, was also significantly affected. “Losses in stone fruits could reach 80% of the potential production; in berries, perhaps 50%,” said the director for development of the UPOA. Source - https://www.freshplaza.com

ANALYTICS SEE ALL

Malta - Vegetable production dropped 7% in 2018

18.10.2019

Last year, Malta’s local vegetable produce dropped by 7% when compared to the previous year. The total vegetables produced in tonnes amounted to 58,178, down by 7% when compared to 2017. Their value too diminished as the total produce was valued at €30 million, down by 13% over the previous year. The most significant drop was in potatoes, down by 27% over the previous year. Tomatoes and onions were the only vegetables to have increased in volume, by 3% and 4% respectively but their value diminished by 9% and 24% respectively. The figures were published by the National Statistics Office on the event of World Food Day 2019, which will be celebrated on Wednesday. Cauliflower, cabbage and lettuce produce dropped by 10%, 3%, and 12% respectively. In the realm of local fruit, a drop of produce was registered here too apart from strawberries, which experienced a whopping increase of 58% over 2017. Total fruit produced in 2018 amounted to 13,057 tonnes, down by 1% when compared to 2017. The total produce was valued at €10 million, a 3% increase in value. Peaches produced were down by 35% and the 376 tonnes of peaches cultivated amounted to €0.5 million in value. Orange produce dropped by 10% and lemon produce dropped by 14%. There was no change in the amount of grapes produced and the 3,642 tonnes of grapes produced in 2018 were valued at €2.3 million. 70% of fruit and vegetables consumed in Malta is imported. The drop in local produce could be the result of deleterious or unsuitable weather patterns. Source - https://www.freshplaza.com

USA - Greenhouse tomato production spans most states

07.10.2019

While Florida and California accounted for 76 percent of U.S. production of field-grown tomatoes in 2016, greenhouse production and use of other protected-culture technologies help extend the growing season and make production feasible in a wider variety of geographic locations. Some greenhouse production is clustered in traditional field-grown-tomato-producing States like California. However, high concentrations of greenhouses are also located in Nebraska, Minnesota, New York, and other States that are not traditional market leaders. Among the benefits that greenhouse tomato producers can realize are greater market access both in the off-season and in northern retail produce markets, better product consistency, and improved yields. These benefits make greenhouse tomato production an increasingly attractive alternative to field production despite higher production costs. In addition to domestic production, a significant share of U.S. consumption of greenhouse tomatoes is satisfied by imports. In 2004, U.S., Mexican, and Canadian growers each contributed about 300 million pounds of greenhouse tomatoes annually to the U.S. fresh tomato market. Since then, Mexico’s share of the greenhouse tomato market has grown sharply, accounting for almost 84 percent (1.8 billion pounds) of the greenhouse volume coming into the U.S. market. Source - https://www.freshplaza.com

World cherry production will decrease to 3.6 million tons

03.10.2019

According to information from the USDA for the 2019-2020 season, world cherry production is expected to decrease slightly and amount to 3.6 million tons. This decline is due to the damages that the weather caused on cherry crops in the European Union. Even though Chile is expected to achieve a record export, world trade in cherries is expected to drop to 454,000 tons, based on lower shipments from Uzbekistan and the US. Turkey Turkey's production is expected to increase to 865,000. As a result of the strong export demand, producers continue to invest and improve their orchards, switching to high yield varieties and gradually expanding the surface for sweet cherries. More supplies are expected to increase exports to a record 78,000 tons, continuing its long upward trend. Chile Chile's production is forecast to increase from 30,000 tons to 231,000 as they have a larger area of mature trees. Between 2009/10 and 2018/19, the crop area has almost tripled, a trend that is expected to continue. The country is expected to export up to 205,000 tons in higher supplies. The percentage of exports destined for China has increased from 13 to almost 90% since 2009/10. China China's production is expected to increase by up to 24% and to amount to 420,000 tons, due to the recovery of the orchards that were damaged by frost last year. In addition, there are new crops that will go into production. Imports are expected to increase by 15,000 tons and to stand at 195,000 tons, as the increase in supplies from Chile will more than compensate for the lower shipments from the United States. Although higher tariffs are maintained for American cherries, the United States is expected to remain China's main supplier in the northern hemisphere. United States US production is expected to remain stable at 450,000 tons. Imports are expected to increase to 18,000 tons with more supplies available from Chile. Exports are forecast to decrease for the second consecutive year to 80,000 tons, as high retaliatory tariffs continue to suppress US shipments to China. If this happens, it will be the first time that US cherry exports experience a decrease in 2 consecutive years since 2002/03, when production suffered a fall of 44%. European Union EU production is projected to fall by more than 20%, remaining at 648,000 tons because of the hail that affected the early varieties in Italy, and the frost, low temperatures, and drought that caused a significant loss of fruit in Poland, the main producer. Lower supplies are expected to pressure exports to 15,000 tons and increase imports to 55,000 tons. Russia Russia's imports are expected to contract by 13,000 tons to 80,000 with lower supplies from Kazakhstan, Moldova, and Serbia. Source - https://www.freshplaza.com

EU - 20% fewer apples and 14% fewer pears than last year

09.08.2019

This year's European apple production is expected to come to 10,556,000 tons. That is 20% less than last year. It is also 8% less than the average over the past three years. The European pear harvest is expected to be 2,047,000 tons. This is 14% lower than last year and 9% less than the previous three seasons average. These figures are according to the World Apple and Pear Association, WAPA's top fruit prognoses. They presented their report at Prognosfruit this morning. Apple harvest per country Poland is Europe's apple-growing giant. This country is expected to process 44% fewer apples. The yield is expected to be 2,710,000 tons. Last year, this was still 4,810,000 tons. In Italy, yields are only three percent lower than last year. According to WAPA, this country will have an apple harvest of 2,195,000 tons. France takes third place. They will even have 12% more apples than last year to process - 1,652,000 tons. Pear harvest per country With 511,000 tons, Italy's pear harvest is much lower than last year. It has dropped by 30%. In terms of the average over the previous three seasons, this fruit's yield is 29% lower. In the Netherlands, the pear harvest is expected to be six percent lower, at 379,000 tons. This volume is still 3% more than the average over the last three years. Belgium has 10% fewer pears (331,000 tons) than last year. They are just ahead of Spain. With 311,000 tons, Spain who will harvest four percent more pears. Apple harvest per variety The Golden Delicious remains, by far, the largest apple variety in Europe. It is expected that 2,327,000 tons of these apples will be harvested this year. This is three percent less than last year. At 1,467,000 tons, Gala estimations are exactly the same as last year. The European Elstar harvest will also be roughly equivalent to last year. A volume of 355,000 tons of this variety is expected. Pear harvest per variety Looking at the different varieties, the European Conference is estimated to be 8% lower than last year. A volume of 910,000 tons is expected. The low Italian pear estimate will result in 34% fewer Abate Fetel pears (211,000 tons) being available. This is according to WAPA's estimate. This makes this variety smaller than the Williams BC (230.000 ton) in Europe. Source - https://www.freshplaza.com